Thursday, September 11, 2008

Kiplinger's: 37 Things to Do With $1,000

"Invest in stocks, yourself, your home, or your community." Those are a few of the 37 things to do with an extra $1,000, according to the October issue of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine. Here are a few ideas with a link to the full article:

"Get In on a Great Fund. Few outstanding funds let you in for under $1,000—but at $250, Hodges Fund (HDPMX) is a steal. The annualized return for the past five years is 16%; for the past ten years, 8%. Compare that with Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index, which returned 8% and 3%. For $1,000, enter the Harbor Bond Fund (HABDX), which delivers a half percentage point to a full percentage point more than the typical bond fund or bond index.

Prep for Success. Hire a career coach to help you focus your professional goals—which could take you and your salary to the next level. But not every coach has extensive experience, so look for a professional with former clients who can attest to the coach’s effectiveness.

Stock a Stellar Cellar. Buy 60 bottles of the world’s finest wines—from chardonnays to cabernet sauvignons. At $22 a bottle, Rupert & Rothschild Classique 2005 is silky and beautifully balanced. From high-altitude vineyards in Argentina, Catena Chardonnay 2006 is priced at $18 a bottle, well below the cost of comparable California wines.

Pull the Plug. Cut your electric bill with a solar attic fan, which exhausts hot air that raises your cooling costs. Install solar-powered outdoor lamps to light your path, without lightening your wallet.

Have a Heart. Bring relief to the poor in developing countries with a Mercy Kit through Mercy Corps, an Oregon-based charity. Purchase a Children’s Food Kit or Playground Kit to help communities in need. "

Here's the full article—containing all 37 ideas.

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1 comment:

MITBeta @ Don't Feed the Alligators said...

"Get In on a Great Fund"

Past performance is a poor indicator, at best, of future performance.